Field Report: Taipei, Taiwan (05 November 2014)

05Nov14 Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport Taipei 001

My brief holiday in Taipei last month was the scene of some notable firsts. For one thing, it was my first time in Taiwan, and I certainly hope it won’t be the last!

Secondly, this was the first trip I documented using only my mobile phone camera, without toting the larger interchangeable lens camera that I usually bring along whenever I travel. Call it an experiment at lighter, leaner solo travel. (^_^)


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First, a few preliminaries (which those planning a similar trip from my corner of the world might find useful). Taiwan allows passport holders of about 50 countries and territories to enter the island without a visa, or grants them visas upon arrival. Unfortunately, the Philippines isn’t one of those lucky few, so this was something I had to sort out before setting off.

Fortunately, they’ve made things a lot easier by allowing qualified passport holders to apply online for an authorisation to enter and remain in Taiwan for 30 days, effectively granting visa-free access to such travellers. Since I was qualified for a permit under the criteria they’ve set, all I had to do was fill in an electronic form and I received a permit almost instantaneously, which I then printed out for presentation to the relevant authorities.

Of course, your eligibility will be rigorously checked at the airport so there’s no cheating the system. If you don’t meet the qualifications for this type of travel permit, you’ll need to apply for a standard visa sticker – refer to the TECO website for more details.

As for transportation, I booked a round-trip ticket on Cebu Pacific for the measly sum of PHP 5,829.78. (If I didn’t add luggage, food, and travel insurance, the ticket price would have been substantially lower.) You can read my review of the outbound journey here, and I may eventually write a similar review covering the return journey.

All right, I think we’re all set. Let’s go.

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The journey began at Manila’s Ninoy Aquino International Airport. My flight – click here to read more about that – was assigned to depart from Terminal 3, the newest of the airport’s four terminal buildings and (after years of labour) still something of a work-in-progress, with parts undergoing completion work or repairs.

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 001

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 002

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05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 005

Perched on top of a black stone pedestal, the bronze bust of a certain bespectacled statesman gazes over the airport that bears his name.

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 003

This glass-and-steel divider is all that separates us international travellers from the terminal’s domestic wing.

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 006

If it looks like a flimsy last-minute addition, that’s because it probably is. The entire building was originally designed to handle only international flights – a role to which it might revert at some point in the future – so splitting it into two parts to cater to different routes came as something of an afterthought and didn’t demand a more radical solution than setting up a few barriers.

The secure area after immigration is pretty dry and soulless, with a shortage of good shops and restaurants. That will (hopefully) change in the coming years as more businesses move into the long stretches of boarded-up retail space lining the corridors of the terminal, but for the moment, don’t expect anything sophisticated.

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 007

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05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 010

05Nov14 Ninoy Aquino International Airport Terminal 3 MNL Manila Philippines 011

Then came the flight itself, and the next time I set foot on solid ground it was in Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport. The passengers on our flight were funnelled into Terminal 1, the older of the airport’s two terminal buildings but also the beneficiary of a recent facelift.

05Nov14 Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport Taipei 001

05Nov14 Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport Taipei 002

05Nov14 Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport Taipei 003

From the airport, I took an express bus service (TWD 125 one-way) to Taipei Main Station. The journey takes about an hour. Those in a hurry might consider taking a taxi or arranging a private car, but this will likely shave just minutes off the time required.

A brief note on the commute: if you’re hoping to catch a train directly from the airport to the city, you’ll need to wait a bit . . . like a good 12 months. The metro line project that’s intended to link Taoyuan Airport to Taipei is running years behind schedule and isn’t expected to open until December 2015. (An indirect rail link via the THSR network currently exists, but casual travellers may find that it’s not worth the added expense and the hassle of an extra transfer.)

My home for the night – on Huayin Street, northwest of Taipei Station – was only a few minutes’ walk away from the bus stop.

And here we are – my simple accommodations in the Taipei Station branch of Hotel Puri.

05Nov14 Hotel Puri Taipei Station Branch Taiwan 001

05Nov14 Hotel Puri Taipei Station Branch Taiwan 002

05Nov14 Hotel Puri Taipei Station Branch Taiwan 003

I only booked one of my two nights in this hotel. I was actually planning to stay at a certain hostel for the whole trip, but the hostel’s reception desk closes before midnight and I didn’t want to run the risk of turning up to a locked front door. Special arrangements were possible but I didn’t want to bother – and as you’ll see in a future post, transferring to the hostel posed almost no difficulty.

Time check. Mm, it was well past 10 PM by the time I got to my hotel room. Probably just the start of the day for night owls, but a long way past my usual bedtime.

Good night chaps. Our agenda for tomorrow: a walk through the historic district of Tamsui, north of central Taipei.

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7 responses to “Field Report: Taipei, Taiwan (05 November 2014)

  1. Pingback: Flight Report: MNL-TPE on 5J 312 | Within striking distance·

    • Japan is a great place to visit but it pays to broaden one’s horizons. I still plan to visit Japan every year, of course – I’ll just branch off into other countries on top of that. (^_^)

      You’re more than welcome to stop by again on Boxing Day, I should have the next post ready by then.

      Cheers and happy Christmas.

  2. Sir, the glass barrier separating the air side (international) from the terminal side is accepted practice. Charles de Gaul and Frankfurt International airports have those design but have sturdy with stainless steel posts. Our T3 wide space check-in pavilion design is also similar to Frankfurt’s but theirs is 2x as big.

    • Hi mate, thanks for stopping by.

      Regarding the barrier, I’ve also seen a similar glass wall elsewhere but it’s as you pointed out – in other places it’s sturdier and more solid, with a stronger-looking steel framework. What I find interesting about the one in T3 is how it fails to convey any sense of security; weak-looking almost to the point that one might easily imagine it being taken down by a wayward shopping cart, or a hard ram from a strong shoulder.

      Also, the barrier in the image posted above is not between the airside zone and the rest of the terminal – it’s between two airside zones (international and domestic). I speak from experience because I took a domestic flight from T3 not too long ago and saw the same barrier, except from the other side.

      Interesting observation re: FRA. I suppose the similarity makes sense, given that T3 is German-designed.

      Cheers and a happy Christmas to you and your family.

  3. Pingback: Field Report: Taipei, Taiwan (06 November 2014) | Within striking distance·

  4. Pingback: Hostel Report: Star Hostel – Taipei Main Station (Taipei, Taiwan) | Within striking distance·

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